How cheetahs went extinct in India, and how they are being brought back | Explained News,The Indian Express

In India, the cheetah population used to be fairly widespread. The animal was found from Jaipur and Lucknow in the north to Mysore in the south, and from Kathiawar in the west to Deogarh in the east.

Monday, Sep 19, 2022

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How cheetahs went extinct in India, and how they are being brought back

In India, the cheetah population used to be fairly widespread. The animal was found from Jaipur and Lucknow in the north to Mysore in the south, and from Kathiawar in the west to Deogarh in the east.











Written by Esha Roy
, Edited by Explained Desk
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New Delhi | Updated: September 18, 2022 12:59:56 pm



































Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) Founder and Executive Director Dr. Laurie Marker and CCF cheetah specialist team prepare a cheetah for the translocation to India at the CCF centre in Otjiwarongo, Namibia, September 12, 2022. Courtesy of Cheetah Conservation Fund/Handout via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES.Over 70 years after it went extinct in India, the cheetah will return to the country on Saturday, September 17, coinciding with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s birthday. Eight African cheetahs from Namibia — five females and three males between the ages of 4-6 years — will be flown 8,000 km over the Indian ocean to the Kuno National Park in Madhya Pradesh, where they will be released as part of India’s Rs 90-crore Cheetah Introduction project.

India was to receive 20 African cheetahs this year – eight from Namibia and another 12 from South Africa — but Environment Ministry officials have said that while all the protocols from the Indian side to bring the South African cheetahs had been completed, assent from the South African government is still awaited.

This is the first time in the world that a large carnivore will be relocated from one continent to another.

The cheetah has an ancient history in the country, with a Neolithic cave painting of a ‘slender spotted feline being hunted’ having been found at Chaturbunj Nala in Mandasur, Madhya Pradesh. The name ‘cheetah’ is believed to have originated from Sanskrit word chitrak, which means ‘the spotted one’.

In India, the cheetah population used to be fairly widespread. The animal was found from Jaipur and Lucknow in the north to Mysore in the south, and from Kathiawar in the west to Deogarh in the east.

https://indianexpress.com/article/explained/india-cheetah-relocation-extinction-narendra-modi-explained-8155532/


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