A shut-off switch was supposed to prevent 99% of generator-related deaths. It failed a family of three.

Generator makers claim automatic shut-off switches can prevent most carbon monoxide poisoning deaths, but the CPSC says the industry standard falls short of what’s necessary to reduce fatalities.

This article was published in partnership with ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power, and The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan local newsroom that informs and engages with Texans. Sign up to receive ProPublica’s biggest stories as soon as they’re published, and sign up for The Brief Weekly to get up to speed on essential coverage of Texas issues.

The generator industry’s promised fix for deadly carbon monoxide poisoning was put to the test last year on a narrow patio outside Demetrice Johnson’s home after Hurricane Ida plunged much of Louisiana into darkness.

Johnson’s brand-new generator — equipped with a safety mechanism that manufacturers have said prevents “more than 99%” of carbon monoxide poisoning deaths — hummed into the night, inches from her family’s back door on Sept. 1, 2021, powering an air conditioner and a refrigerator.

If carbon monoxide levels got too high, the generator was designed to automatically sense the danger and trigger a shut-off switch.

But by the time emergency responders entered the three-bedroom brick house in Jefferson Parish the next morning, Johnson and her children, 17-year-old Craig Curley Jr. and 23-year-old Dasjonay Curley, were dead. They had been poisoned by exhaust fumes that flowed from the generator into their home, according to a sheriff’s office report, exposing a safety deficiency that federal officials and consumer advocates have warned about.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/cpsc-generator-related-deaths-failed-rcna48157


Post ID: 08652939-c30f-42a7-a82c-db4121aab3cd
Rating: 1
Updated: 23 hours ago
Paris, Île-de-France

Seattle, Washington
Member since Feb 2021


Similar classified ads


Randy's other ads